Tag Archives: Pantone

Color Tidbits

Leave it to me to find random trivia about color…

  • Chromadynamics is the study of the physiological effects caused by observing color. Scientists have proven that certain colors effect vision, hearing, respiration and circulation.
  • A year-long study at the University of California helped dispel the belief that canines are colorblind. Three greyhounds, Flip, Gypsy and Retina, had no trouble telling red from blue, but could not distinguish yellow, green or orange.
  • A test conducted at the American Psychology Association Convention found that the most favored jelly beans are black and red, and the least favored are white. This shows the perception of strength and weakness based on color extends into the area of taste.
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Fun and Useful Color Tidbits

I read this article on the Pantone site.
fun and useful color tidbits

  • When calibrating a monitor, make sure that the monitor has been on for at least 30 minutes before making any adjustments, as this allows the CRT tube to warm up and the colors to settle.
  • Improve the luster of your metallics: remember to specify liquid ink when working with metallic colors to achieve optimal results. New liquid inks containing intermediate-sized pigment particles provide higher levels of brilliance than conventional paste inks, which generally contain smaller particles.
  • Some pigments are more lightfast than others. This is extremely important when choosing colors for printed material destined for exposure to sunlight, such as outdoor signage and window displays. Seek guidance from your commercial printer or PANTONE Licensed Printing Ink Manufacturer to mitigate concerns.

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OUCH!

I read this article on the Pantone site.
Which I guess basically sucks for, just me…(and maybe Dad…seeing how the rest of y’all have blue eyes)

OUCH!

If you have dark brown eyes, the news is bad. You are more apt to experience pain resulting from dental cavity preparation than a blue-eyed person. In a study conducted by Dr. Phillip R N. Sutton at the University of Melbourne Dental School in Australia, it was shown that the subjects with the least reaction to pain had blue, green, or hazel eyes.

Pain intensified slightly in light and medium brown eyes, with a marked reaction by those subjects with dark brown eyes.

Seeing (or not seeing) colors

Protans are commonly called “red-defective.” they confuse certain reds, grays and bluish-greens and have a reduced sensitivity in the red end of the visible spectrum. Deutans are commonly called “green-defective;” they confuse certain greens, grays and purplish reds.